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European Social Model

European Social Model

State of play

The European social model provides a true safety net for all citizens of the European Union. Today, however, basic social rights are threatened by a lack of common action.

There are reasons for this:

  • Lack of a European dimension: 
    Europe has for too long been seen as a mere market. Yet economic integration cannot be achieved without social integration, otherwise unhealthy competition between the peoples of Europe will arise. 
  • Unbalanced standards:
    By accepting on European soil products from regions of the world that do not meet any of the standards to which our own producers are subjected, we create an understandable feeling of rebellion and rejection among our fellow citizens.

Our proposals

The European Union must consolidate a common pillar of social rights based on the highest standards of each Member State.

  • A tax and social convergence treaty:
    This new stage of harmonisation is essential to put an end to excessive distortions within the European Union and will concern in particular the basis and effective rates of corporation tax and social security contributions. It must then lead to the establishment of a European minimum income, fair working conditions, fair labour regulations and social legislation (in terms of health, safety, equal opportunities, working hours, holidays, etc.) and adequate remuneration.
  • A new intergenerational solidarity pact:
    Youth employment is a major priority. This is part of the intergenerational contract, improving their personal conditions while helping to finance social expenditure.
  • A strengthened regional solidarity:
    Structural Fund policies must continue to be pursued in order to allow the growth of the regions to be promoted, while ensuring that these subsidies are used efficiently and effectively.
  • Reciprocity of social and environmental clauses in our trade relations:
    Reciprocity should be the cornerstone of our trade agreements and must protect our producers from distorted competition while promoting better working conditions and wages for foreign producers.

Our commitments

Every day the EDP defends its ideas through various actions and asserts its positions. For example:

  • In the European Parliament: 
    Marian Harkin, Robert Rochefort, Nathalie Griesbeck et Ivo Vajgl, MEP, defend these ideas and principles in the Committee on Employment and Social Affairs.
  • In our Manifesto: 
    We have been defending these proposals for several years. They were already at the heart of our first program in 2004. 
IED YDE